ARMY FAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM

GUIDE FOR NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS


INDEX

INTRODUCTION

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NCOs,

The Department of the Army recognizes that high morale, retention, and unit readiness are connected to the kinds of training and support available for soldiers and their families.

The Directorate of Personnel and Community Activities provides a variety of services, activities, and training programs for soldiers and families. One of these is the Army Community Service's Family Advocacy Program (FAP). The Family Advocacy Program uses a coordinated community approach to support soldiers and families, to prevent family violence, and to intervene when necessary to ensure everyone's safety.

Prevention and intervention in family violence is a community responsibility: no single individual, agency, or organization can implement an effective and comprehensive program. Teamwork is the key.

NCOs are major team members for the success of this mission because they are frequently on the "front line" when it comes to assisting soldiers and families.

This guide is provided to assist with this challenging task by providing a brief overview of the different parts of the program. It is a handy reference to the resources available on this installation for soldiers and families.

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INDEX

  • WHAT DOES THE FAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM (FAP) DO?
  • WHAT PREVENTION/TREATMENT IS AVAILABLE?
  • WHAT DO NCOS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PREVENTION?
  • WHAT DO NCOS NEED TO DO?
  • WHAT IS THE REPORTING PROCESS?
  • WHAT ARE NCOS RESPONSIBILITIES?
  • WHAT GETS REPORTED?
  • WHAT DO NCOS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT INTERVENTION?
  • WHAT PREVENTION/TREATMENT IS AVAILABLE?
  • GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS
  • WHAT DOES THE FAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM (FAP) DO?

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    FAP supports soldiers and their families in managing personal and family problems. For soldiers involved in family violence, early FAP referral reduces risk, establishes safety limits, and provides treatment for victims and offenders.

    PREVENTION/EDUCATION

    • Information, workshops/classes, discussion groups, and special activities on how to deal with normal life changes and Army challenges
    • Parent Education and Support
      • Parent Education
      • Prenatal/Perinatal Program
        • FIRST STEPS
        • New Parent Support Program (NPSP)
        • Programs for New Parents
    • Relationship Support
    • Stress Management
    • Child Safety Education
    • Violence Management

    INTERVENTION/TREATMENT

    • Treatment for persons involved in child/spouse abuse:
      • to restore family stability
      • to change abusive patterns, and
      • to interrupt the cycle of violence
    • Domestic Violence Awareness Workshop (1-4 weeks)
    • Counseling: individual, marriage, family, support groups, violence management (5-24 weeks)
    • Foster Care
    • Financial Planning
    • Respite Care
    • Shelter Services

    WHAT PREVENTION/TREATMENT IS AVAILABLE?

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    INDEX OF PERSONAL AND FAMILY ISSUES

    EMERGENCY AID

    • Child Care (Child Development Services)
    • Food (ACS: Army Emergency Relief)
    • Rent/Utilities (ACS: Army Emergency Relief, ACS: Financial Planning)
    • Shelter (SWS: Family Violence Intervention)
    • Transportation (ACS: Army Emergency Relief)
    • Crisis Care (SWS: Family Violence)

    EMOTIONAL SUPPORT/COUNSELING

    • Alcohol Misuse (ADAPCP, Legal Services)
    • Chronic Medical Problem (MTF)
    • Death/Grief (Community Mental Health Services)
    • Deployment/Family Separation (ACS)
    • Depression (Community Mental Health Services)
    • Drug Misuse (ADAPCP, Legal Services)
    • Foreign Spouse Adaptation (ACS: Outreach)
    • Mental Status Evaluations (Community Mental Health Services)
    • Social Isolation (ACS: Outreach, FAP: Respite Child Care)
    • Special Needs Family Members (ACS: Exceptional Family Member Program)
    • Waiting Spouse (ACS: Outreach)

    FAMILY VIOLENCE

    • Suspected Child/Spouse Abuse (FAP & SWS: Family Violence Intervention)
    • Financial Planning (ACS: Financial Planning)
    • Loans (ACS: Army Emergency Relief)
    • Overdrawn Checks (ACS: Financial Planning)
    • Rent -- Emergency Deposit (ACS: Army Emergency Relief)
    • Travel -- Emergency Expenses (ACS: Army Emergency Relief)
    • Unemployed Spouse (ACS: Family Member Employment Assistance)

    HOUSING

    • Rental/Real Estate (Housing)

    JOB ISSUES

    • Career Decisions (ACS: Family Member Employment Assistance)
    • ACS: Relocation Services Supervisor/Co-worker Conflict (FAP: Stress Management)
    • Unemployed Spouse (ACS: Family Member Employment Assistance)

    LEGAL MATTERS

    • Alcohol/Drug Misuse (Legal Services, ADAPCP)
    • Driving While Intoxicated (Legal Services, ADAPCP)
    • Youthful Offenders (Legal Services)

    PARENTING

    • Child Care -- full-time/hourly (CDS)
    • Family Planning (SWS: Family Planning)
    • Parenting Support (FAP: Parenting Support, Chaplaincy)
    • Pregnancy -- new, teen (FAP: Parenting Support, SWS: Family Planning)
    • Safety Education for Children (FAP: Safety Education)
    • Single Parents (FAP: Parent Support)
    • Special Needs Children (ACS: Exceptional Family Member, FAP: Parenting Support)
    • Step Parents (FAP: Parent Support)
    • Stress Management (FAP: Stress Management)
    • Teen Issues (FAP: Parent Support, Youth Services)
    • Unit Training (FAP: Briefings, Classes)
    • Youth Recreation (Youth Services)

    RELATIONSHIPS

    • Interpersonal Skills: Anger Control, Communication, Conflict Resolution, Problem Solving, Self Esteem (FAP: Adult Relationships, SWS: Counseling)
    • Marriage Enhancement (FAP: Adult Relationships,
    • SWS: Counseling, Chaplaincy)
    • Neighbor Disputes (FAP: Adult Relationships, Housing)
    • Newly Married/Engaged (FAP: Adult Relationships, Chaplaincy)
    • Stress Management (FAP: Stress Management)
    • Unit Training (FAP: Briefings, Classes)

    TRANSITIONS

    • Career Decisions (ACS: Family Member Employment Assistance Program, ACS: Relocation Assistance)
    • Compassionate Reassignment (Chaplaincy)
    • English as Second Language (ACS: Outreach)
    • Incoming/Outgoing (ACS)
    • Personnel (ACS: Outreach)
    • Isolation (ACS: Outreach)
    • Relocation Assistance (ACS: Relocation Assistance)
    • Retirement (ACS: Relocation Assistance)
    • Unemployed Spouse (ACS: Family Member Employment Assistance)
    • Waiting Spouse (ACS: Outreach)
    • Work/Responsibility Changes (FAP: Stress Management)

    WHAT DO NCOS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PREVENTION?

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    t do ncos need to know about prevention?

    Prevention is anticipating problems and building supports and skills to withstand crises and the everyday problems of life.


    COMMANDER'S AND FIRST SERGEANTS'S MESSAGE TO NCOS


    SOLDIER'S AND FAMILY MEMBER'S RESPONSIBILITIES


    LEADERSHIP APPROACH SUPPORTIVE APPROACH
    • Issues Orders
    • Makes Requests
    • Exercises Authority
    • Encourages
    • Closed (no information exchanged)
    • Shares Information
    • Uses "you" statements
    • Uses "I" statements
    • Preplans outcomes and asks "why" questions
    • Listens and asks "how" questions

    WHAT DO NCOS NEED TO DO?

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    WHAT IS THE REPORTING PROCESS?

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    NCOs must follow established procedures for assisting soldiers and families when reports of family violence surface. The reporting requirement for child and spouse abuse states that every soldier, employee, and member of the military community should be encouraged to report information about known and suspected cases of child abuse and cases of spouse abuse.

    NCO'S RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE REPORTING PROCESS


    WHAT ARE NCOS RESPONSIBILITIES?

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    Unit Preparedness Self Responsibility Early Referral
    • Talk openly about concerns at the first signs of stress.
    • Report when appropriate, but keep other information in confidence.
    • Discuss standards, rules, and consequences.
    • Work jointly with Command when called upon to carry out safety measures.

    "Be willing to take risks. Making necessary referrals is not a betrayal of trust." --SG

    • Refer to support services.
    • Avoid giving advice or being judmental.
    • Understand the CRC protocol and treatment services.

    SOLDIER'S AND FAMILY MEMBER'S RESPONSIBILITIES



    Prevent or stop violent or self- destructive behaviors.

    Understand that stress or a crisis decreases one's ability to make sound decisions.

    Recognize that NCOs and community services are there to help.

    What GETS REPORTED?

    WHAT GETS REPORTED?

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    CHILD ABUSE


    Includes minor, moderate, and severe forms of child physical abuse, child neglect, sexual maltreatment, and emotional maltreatment of a child by a parent, guardian, or other person who is responsible for the child's welfare.

    Intentional, physical injury (e.g., bruises, burns, head injuries, etc.).

    Failure to provide for basic physical child care needs (e.g., nourishment, clothing, shelter, medical/dental care, education, and/or supervision) which results in risk to the child's health and safety (e.g., lack of supervision, or unsanitary or unsafe living conditions placing a child at risk for illness or injury, failure to use car seats, leaving a child at home unattended etc.).

    Children aged 9 years or under are not to be left unattended or in the care of younger siblings 12 years and under. The elements considered in determining a case of neglect are the length of time the child is unattended, the reason the parents are unavailable, the child's use of emergency contacts, and the overall independence and maturity of the child.

    Involvement or enticement of a child to engage in any sexual act or situation that may include molestation, rape, sodomy, or other form of exploitation.

    Caregiver behavior which causes low self-esteem, undue fear or anxiety, or other damage to a child's emotional well-being. Verbal abuse or excessive demands on the child's performance which results in impaired emotional and/or educational development.

    SPOUSE ABUSE


    • Use of intentional physical force that causes physical injury to the spouse (e.g., scratching, pulling hair, throwing objects at someone, pushing, grabbing, punching, choking, using weapons, etc.)
    • Use of intentional acts that affect the psychological and emotional well-being of the spouse. Usually this occurs over a sustained period of time, and a pattern is evident or developing (e.g., jealous remarks, put-downs, name calling, intimidation, destruction of personal belongings, imposing limits, etc.)
    • The forcing of one spouse by the other spouse to engage in any sexual activity through the use of physical violence, intimidation, or the explicit or implicit threat of future violence.

    THE CYCLE OF VIOLENCE


    When soldiers and families get involved in violent incidents their behaviors often suggest that they are trapped in a "cycle of violence":

    1. TENSION BUILDING (i.e., demands increase, stress builds up, "walking on egg shells", put-downs)...leads to

    2. EXPLOSION (i.e., hitting, threatening, pushing, humiliating, controlling)...followed by

    3. HONEYMOON (i.e., denial of the problem; gives the spouse hope for change: "It's over now. It won't happen again. It only happened because...Everything is OK now."; makes promises; cries; declares love; gives presents.

    WHAT DO NCOS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT INTERVENTION?

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    COMMANDER'S AND FIRST SERGEANT'S MESSAGE TO NCOS


    FOCUS ON SAFETY KNOW YOUR SOLDIERS USE SERVICES EARLY
    • Protect soldiers and families by initiating recommended safety measures.
    • Monitor the situation closely.
    • Create a climate for self referrals.

    "Know when to get outside support." --1SG

    • Support the Case Review Committee protocols and recommendations.

    "Everyone has the right to feel free from harm." --Unit CDR

    WHAT PREVENTION/TREATMENT IS AVAILABLE?

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    ARMY COMMUNITY SERVICE, FAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM, FORT_____________________

    Alcohol/Drug Abuse Prevention/Control Program (ADAPCP) 123.4567
    Army Community Service (ACS) 123.4567
    Army Emergency Relief Program
    123.4567
    Consumer Affairs Program
    123.4567
    Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP)
    123.4567
    Family Advocacy Program (FAP)
    123.4567
    Family Member Employment Assistance Program (FMEAP)
    123.4567
    Financial Planning
    123.4567
    Outreach 123.4567
    Relocation Assistance
    123.4567
    Volunteer Program
    123.4567
    Chapel 123.4567
    Child Development Services (CDS) 123.4567
    Community Mental Health Services 123.4567
    Housing 123.4567
    Health Promotion 123.4567
    Legal Services 123.4567
    Social Work Service (SWS) 123.4567
    Youth Services 123.4567
    Other 123.4567
      123.4567
      123.4567

    GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS

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    ACS Army Community Service

    ADCO Alcohol and Drug Officer

    ADAPCP Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Control Program

    CDS Child Development Services

    CHN Community Health Nurse

    CPS Child Protective Services

    CRC Case Review Committee

    DCPA Director of Personnel and Community Activities

    FAP Family Advocacy Program

    FAPM Family Advocacy Program Manager

    FAST Family Advocacy Staff Training

    FASTA Family Advocacy Staff Training Advanced

    FCC Family Child Care

    MTF Medical Treatment Facility

    PM Provost Marshall

    RPOC Report Point of Contact

    SIR Serious Incident Report

    SJA Staff Judge Advocate

    SWS Social Work Service

    USACIDC U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command

    USACFSC U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center

    YS Youth Services

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    This material was developed for the U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center, Family Advocacy Program by staff of the Family Life Development Center in cooperation with Cornell Cooperative Extension, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. This material is based upon work supported by the Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under special project number 92-EXCA-3-0221.

    THIS MATERIAL MAY BE REPRODUCED FOR FAP USE.


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